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View Full Version : [WINDOWS] FAT32 CAN hold more than 32gbs. Actually up to 2TB.



Aurora078
09-16-2010, 05:51 AM
Yes, for anyone who ever had problems with their huge NTFS HDD's and were led to believe that fat32 cant hold more than 32gigs, your problem is solved. FAT32 can actually hold up to about 2TB( Terabytes aka Mr. 1k). People were led to this due to Windows 2000 and XP only formatting 32gigs or less into FAT32. Windows 98 has some restriction around 140gigs, but thats also their file system. Also... I hope I get to see a Zettabyte Hard Drive in my life time, i believe its the equivalent of 1 Trillion Gigs. Thats about the size of the entire internet right noww... Also i heard of Yottabytes, and Geopbytes, and all these other random ones that we probably wont see in our life time. However i heard they the new Petabyte or w/e how you spell are comming out in 2011. Thats a good 1000 TB right there i believe. Imagine what you could do with 1000 Terabytes lol... I don't think one single person could actually find that much stuff to put on it in one lifetime.

Equinox
09-16-2010, 12:00 PM
Do you need all of that?
No.

Does it speed your computer up?
No.

All of that is just stupid amounts of size that is not needed.

a_bertrand
09-16-2010, 01:06 PM
As I work for a research institute I can tell you that 2TB is NOTHING. We have systems which have a lot more than that, and yes we do need it. However, for most users it is indeed way too big and it starts to be marketing to simply have bigger and bigger disks as the usage doesn't grow that fast.

Now for FAT32, the theoretical max size is of 8TB however Microsoft limited the size for windows 95/98 to 32 Gb to force the adoption of NTFS and also due to their 16 bit addressing. Now who use those systems anymore? Don't know...

References:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en;184006
http://en.kioskea.net/contents/repar/fat32.php3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FAT32#FAT32

However, I don't really see the point of discussing fat32 (or other file system) limits, as it doesn't touch much game development.